Amherst College fighting to keep race as a factor in admissions process

Amherst College filed an amicus brief with the U.S. Supreme Court this week in support of Harvard College and the University of North Carolina as they fight to
Published: Aug. 2, 2022 at 6:21 PM EDT
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AMHERST, Mass. (WGGB/WSHM) - Amherst College is taking a stand in support of race and ethnicity remaining a factor in the college admissions process.

It is an issue that could come before the U.S. Supreme Court by the end of the year.

Amherst College filed an amicus brief with the U.S. Supreme Court this week in support of Harvard College and the University of North Carolina as they fight to keep race as a factor in their admissions process.

The non-profit, Students for Fair Admissions Inc., is against it.

“We proudly stand up for diversity, and we believe that the Supreme Court should uphold the college’s opportunity to consider race and ethnicity as one of many factors in the holistic effect process,” said Matthew McGann, Dean of Admission and Financial Aid at Amherst College.

This is not the first time this type of case has been before the nation’s highest court.

“We stand with 40 years of Supreme Court precedent, going all the way back to the 1970s, when the Supreme Court first said that colleges should recognize that diversity can be an important part of the educational experience,” McGann told us.

However, with the Supreme Court recently overturning Roe v. Wade, there is concern this 4-decade-old law could be overturned.

Amherst College told us that each of their applicants is considered based on academic accomplishments, extracurricular activities, family background, race, and overall potential, among other factors.

Plus, 51% of their new students in the fall identify as domestic students of color. An additional 12% are international students.

“To curtail that would really limit the ability for us to enroll such a diverse student body,” McGann said.

The Supreme Court could hear the case as early as November with a potential decision in June.