Mice concerns rise as temperatures begin to drop

With the winter around the corner, homeowners should be on the lookout because mice are now looking for a warm place to stay.
Published: Oct. 17, 2022 at 3:14 PM EDT|Updated: Oct. 17, 2022 at 6:28 PM EDT
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WEST SPRINGFIELD, MA (WGGB/WSHM) - With the winter around the corner, homeowners should be on the lookout because mice are now looking for a warm place to stay.

With temperatures dipping into the 40s at night, homeowners should keep an eye out for mice trying to get inside to stay warm. Western Mass News spoke with Mark Hunter, owner of Hunter Termite and Pest Management, who explained how invasive these pests can be.

“A mouse can fit into a hole the size of a dime, maybe even less, so they can find their way, nibble through little areas…around the garage, bulkhead area, front steps, back steps, different areas throughout the house,” Hunter said.

With mice chewing through anything wood or plastic, he had this advice for homeowners if they believe to have a mouse problem.

“First step is finding the area they are coming in and if you can’t get it under control, buying some…some snap traps down would be helpful, but if you just can’t take care of it, then calling a professional would help,” Hunter added.

Hunter pointed out spots around the outside of your house where mice could crawl in. Check spots like the corners of the foundation, underneath back porches, and bulkhead areas and he said there are some tools for fixing the holes around your house. They include coarse grade, level three steel wool, which mice can’t chew through, a metal strip if the weather stripping along your garage door has holes in it, or if you want a cleaner look for the outside of your house, go with caulk or another type of sealant.

Hunter showed us a spot on one home where a hole was sealed on the connecting tube for an air conditioner unit, which is another typical spot where mice can crawl through. Basement insulation is another place to look. Small holes there may mean mice are nesting there. Also, look for holes in the corners of the walls.

“Going in your basement, turning off the lights, and seeing if there is any light coming through that might be helpful as well,” Hunter noted.

Hunter said it’s important to be proactive if you find any mouse droppings because one female mouse can reproduce anywhere from 35 to 50 mice in one year.